Outdoor Learning : A Headrush Perspective

Over the past few years that we’ve been running training programs,  increasingly, I’ve been aware of two very prominent patterns:

  1. Classroom based learning programs can get very boring. Note, the emphasis on very.
  2. Outdoor learning programs are about 99.92% fun, with .08% incidental learning.

I’m not invalidating either, by the way. I’m saying a training program comprising only one of the two is incomplete. This isn’t just an opinion – research backs it. Limara touched upon this in her Outdoor Learning: What NASA, Harvard and Wharton have in common article.

To be fair, even we’ve been guilty of No. 2, in the past. Not that every outdoor learning program needs to be a boot camp, but if the requirement is training, it would help if the program is focused to bring about deliberate, insightful learning.

This is what drove our decision to form Headrush Insights. Our no-bullsh**, serious, training arm. If you’re trying to cram as many activities in a day as possible, then Headrush Insights probably isn’t for you. If your idea of training is taking 100 people to a resort in Karjat for a 10 AM – 6 PM day out with a laundry list of training objectives, Headrush Insights isn’t for you. For such groups, there’s always good old Headrush Outbound – that facilitator of happy shared experiences! Take him and he’ll make sure your time’s been well spent.

Ideally, Headrush Insights group sizes need to limited to 20 people. These are at least 2 day programs, *focused* around a particular objective. With post-event follow up. We’re sparing no effort in making Insights’ programs a Level 10092 type rigorous training program. Training industry leaders to deliver programs along with our in-house trainers : CHECK. A combination of assessment centers, classroom learning and high impact outdoor learning oriented activities: CHECK. Participants to go WAY beyond their comfort zones: CHECK.

For a short while, we’re offering a free, no-obligation, training needs analysis. If you’re handling a team and feeling like something’s amiss, give us a call on 1800-120-9091 #1 and we’ll probe around and figure what exactly is going on.

Outdoor Learning : What NASA, Harvard and Wharton have in common?

Featured

“Tell me, and I will forget.  Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.”- Confucius

There has been a lot of debate and research dedicated to finding the educational values of outdoor learning. There is ample research available suggesting that both indoor and outdoor trainings have their own educational value and pros- cons. Not surprisingly, research suggests that students remember fieldwork and outdoor visits for many years. Dierking and Falk (1997) found that 96 percent of a group (128 children and adults) could recall field trips taken during their early years at school. However, simply recalling a visit does not mean that it was an effective learning experience or that the time could not be more usefully spent in the classroom. Recent Studies have shown that the skills learned in the wilderness find application long after the course is finished.

 

The most universally effective form of leadership training—one that is used by NASA, Harvard Medical School, and the Wharton School of Business—is the Outdoor Learning model. Characteristics such as self-esteem, confidence, self-efficacy, leadership, and even academic achievement showed long-term improvement after the completion of an outdoor learning course. These measures are the foundation for a creative individual, someone with the gall to create and innovate. Evidence for the relative efficacy of fieldwork comes from a study of secondary students from 11 Californian schools that used an environmentally focused curriculum. The students scored higher in 72 per cent of the academic assessments (reading, science, math, attendance rates and grade point averages) than students from traditional schools (SEER, 2000). Another research by Eaton (2000) found that outdoor learning experiences were more effective for developing cognitive skills than classroom based learning.

In terms of the impact the ability to choose between different kinds of learning activity appears to be an important requirement. The need for effective follow-up work after outdoor learning experiences is stressed by several authors (for example, Orion and Hofstein, 1994).In my opinion a blend of indoor and outdoor trainings may be considered depending on the kind of competency being dealt with. Indoor training provides for more theoretical understanding and allows a large amount of content to be covered in relatively short durations. It also is relatively cost effective and can be used when large numbers of students/participants are involved.

Outdoor learning programmes on the other hand are inarguably the best way to learn application of concepts. It has high value to help learners identify their own potential, push skills to the limit, understand the behaviors that come naturally to him when working with various constraints and identify weaknesses and thereby work on them.With organizing, planning and facilitation, outdoor learning activities afford the opportunity for valuable lessons in acquiring the skills and values necessary for teamwork, problem solving, building trust, and decision making for the good of all constituents. Challenging outdoor experiences in an adventure context builds self-esteem and offers practical experience in leading and following. Youthful participants can observe the characteristics of successful leadership and/or “followership” in these adventure challenges, and with proper oversight, be involved in the decision-making and execution of the resulting plan of action.

This approach teaches the importance of doing your share because others are dependent on you, accepting full ownership of what is required, and doing it to the best of your ability for the benefit of all. Thus, delegating a “teamwork share” of the responsibility is an excellent way to teach youth to contribute by taking their share of ownership of the action plan.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Outdoor Learning : A Headrush Insights Perspective

A totally accessible natural playground create...

A totally accessible natural playground creates a beautiful, outdoor play and learning environment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the past few years that we’ve been running training programs,  increasingly, I’ve been aware of two very prominent patterns:

  1. Classroom based learning programs can get very boring. Note, the emphasis on very.
  2. Outdoor learning programs are about 99.92% fun, with .08% incidental learning.

I’m not invalidating either, by the way. I’m saying a training program comprising only one of the two is incomplete. This isn’t just an opinion – research backs it. Limara touched upon this in her Outdoor Learning: What NASA, Harvard and Wharton have in common article.

To be fair, even we’ve been guilty of No. 2, in the past. Not that every outdoor learning program needs to be a boot camp, but if the requirement is training, it would help if the program is focused to bring about deliberate, insightful learning.

This is what drove our decision to form Headrush Insights. Our no-bullsh**, serious, training arm. If you’re trying to cram as many activities in a day as possible, then Headrush Insights probably isn’t for you. If your idea of training is taking 100 people to a resort in Karjat for a 10 AM – 6 PM day out with a laundry list of training objectives, Headrush Insights isn’t for you. For such groups, there’s always good old Headrush Outbound – that facilitator of happy shared experiences! Take him and he’ll make sure your time’s been well spent.

Ideally, Headrush Insights group sizes need to limited to 20 people. These are at least 2 day programs, *focused* around a particular objective. With post-event follow up. We’re sparing no effort in making Insights’ programs a Level 10092 type rigorous training program. Training industry leaders to deliver programs along with our in-house trainers : CHECK. A combination of assessment centers, classroom learning and high impact outdoor learning oriented activities: CHECK. Participants to go WAY beyond their comfort zones: CHECK.

For a short while, we’re offering a free, no-obligation, training needs analysis. If you’re handling a team and feeling like something’s amiss, give us a call on 1800-120-9091 #1 and we’ll probe around and figure what exactly is going on.

Enhanced by Zemanta

What Makes A Good Leader, IQ or Emotional Intelligence?

Featured

Emotional Intelligence: “Leadership: the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower 

Over the years psychologists, organisational behaviour experts and others have researched the phenomenon to understand what makes some individuals, leaders. Do smarter people make better leaders? Although the the obvious answer is “yes,” it depends on what you mean by ‘smart’.  Almost a century of research on basic intelligence better known as IQ suggests that IQ is slightly to moderately related to attaining a leadership position and to leader’s success. But that doesn’t always fit with people’s experience. Some who we consider geniuses don’t always make good leaders, for example, scientists, brilliant mathematicians, breakthrough artists. On the other hand, we see leaders who don’t appear particularly smart. So, IQ matters, but not as much as we might think. There are, however, other types of intelligence.

 

There has been huge interest in what is called ’emotional intelligence’. It was Daniel Goleman who first brought the term ’emotional intelligence’ to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name, and it was he who first applied the concept to business with his 1998 Harvard Business Review article. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership—such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—are required for success, they are insufficient. Truly effective leaders are also distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill.

 

Qualities such as assertiveness, adaptability, and conscientiousness were cited as the most important. Is Emotional Quotient related to leadership? Yes. It’s important for creating good relationships between leaders and followers. Transformational leaders – leaders who are positive, inspiring, and who empower and develop followers – are better leaders, explains psychologist and leadership expert Ronald E. Riggio. Transformational leaders are usually described as enthusiastic, passionate, genuine and energetic. These qualities may sound soft and unbusinesslike, but Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results.

 

SO how do we become effective leaders? The good news is that the competencies discussed above are pliable. They can be developed. Trainings in leadership development that are conducted by cognitive psychologists focus on development of emotional intelligence and social skills. Most large companies today have employed trained psychologists to develop what are known as ‘competency models’ to aid them in identifying, training, and promoting likely stars in the leadership firmament. The psychologists have also developed such models for lower-level positions. Rationality, emotional well-being and regulation, decision making and logical reasoning are all part of the competencies developed.

Headrush has rigorous corporate training modules for leadership development, via our Headrush Insights training arm. Click here for a list of Headrush Insights modules for Leadership.

For those looking for lighter, more fun modules for outdoor learning can check out  Headrush Outbound. For a detailed list of Headrush Outbound Activities – please check the Headrush Outbound Outdoor Activities section.

References:

Bar-On, Reuven(Ed); Parker, James D. A.(Ed). The handbook of emotional intelligence: Theory, development, assessment, and application at home, school, and in the workplace.

Bass, Bernard M. (2008). The handbook of leadership (4th ed., with Ruth Bass).

Daniel Goleman – Emotional Intelligence (Bantam, 1995)

Riggio, R.E., Murphy, S.E., & Pirozzolo, F.J. (2002). Multiple intelligences and leadership. Erlbaum.

How To Get Rid Of Stretch Marks
How to Get Rid of Acne Scars
How To Get Rid Of Dandruff
© HEADRUSH Ventures [P] Ltd. 2012. All Rights Reserved.